Iranian Rugs and Carpets

Iranian Rugs — Iranian Carpets are often known as Persian Rugs, which are also regarded as one of the oldest oriental rugs. The Iranian rugs and carpets are the valuable treasure with culture.

Brife History of Iranian Rugs and Carpets

Persia, the ancient Persian name of Iran, boasts to be the world’s most superior culture in carpet manufacturing. And the art of carpet weaving and dying is inherited here. Iran is one of the largest countries in the Middle East and stretches like a bridge between the east and west. And the famous ancient Silk Road passed through the country and its caravans brought not only merchandise but also thoughts and ideas were spread among the population.

The country’s official name was Persia until 1934. During the first great Persian dynasty (Achemanids 550-330 B.C.), the empire stretched from Ethiopia to India and from the Bosporus to Oxus. The Persian emperors back then, Darius and Xerxes ruled over 28 different people. The history of the country is dramatic; rulers have come and gone. Both Djinghis Kahn and Timur Lenk ruled Persia. But during the Safavid period, especially during the rule of Shah Abbas the great, who reigned from 1587 to 1629, the country’s art, architecture and handicraft products were greatly developed, Isfahan became the new magnificent capital of the country. And since 1979 Iran has become an Islamic republic country. The oil provides the largest export income, but when it comes to occupation the carpet manufacturing dominates. Millions of Iranians are involved in some way with manufacturing of carpets. And the carpets manufactured in the country are often named after the area where they are made, for example Qum, Tabriz, Isfahan, Hamadan, Mashad, Kerman and Bidjar, etc.. Of course, the carpets can also be named after different ethnic groups like the Ghashghais.

Classic Carpet Weaving Cities in Iran

Iranian rugs and carpets woven in towns and regional centers like Isfahan, Tabriz, Qum, Nain, Kerman, Kashan, Sarouk, Hamadan and Mashed are always characterized by their specific weaving techniques and use of high-quality materials, colors and patterns.

  • Like Isfahan rug, Isfahan became the new magnificent capital of Iran in 16 century, at which Persian rug welcomed its gold time. At that time, Isfahan had the best handmade rug in the world, which were often taken as the significant gifts to present several European countries.
  • Tabriz rug takes traditional patterns as the focus covering almost all patterns of Persian carpets and meanwhile creating many unique designs, such as the Mahi fish-shaped pattern, which is considered by many connoisseurs as the most elegant design in Persian carpets and rugs.
  • Qum rug is famous for the handmade silk rug of all Persian rugs with exquisite design, superb handcrafts and magnificent colors.
  • Nain rug is often known by the silk and wool mixed rug. It’s characterized by using white silk to outline the floral pattern.
  • Kerman rug uses asymmetrical knots with very detailed and intricate curve styles. And there are many layouts in the center area: such as central medallions, trees, bushes, hunting scene, and various other human figures or movements.
  • Kashan rug is mostly designed with a diamond-shaped medallion matching with traditional red and blue colors. Some recent Kashan rugs also use light brown, grayish blue and palm green hues.
  • Sarouk rugs are commonly used for asymmetrical knots and easily identifiable by the straight lines of the Persian fancy decorations. These traditional Persian fancy decorations include vines, leaves and buds, which appear rigid in the carpet but are very effective. This highly innovative line character began in the late nineteenth century and slowly turned itself into a curve and natural style. This layout is most commonly used in the center medallion which can be a large hexagon, a small round or rhomboidal shape with pendants and triangle walls that extend outward on both sides. The Sarouk rug also employs the layout of decorative elements and prayer rugs. The background of the central area is usually ivory, beige, red, and blue colors.
  • Hamadan rugs are made with a symmetric knotting method. The suede is trimmed very high, and there is also a compact structure, including alternately passing through the weft in each row of nodes. The most common layout consists of a medallion or an overlapping medallion. The rhomboid and hexagonal medallions are also characteristic of the carpets in this area which usually has two pendants protruding outwards, and its interior is decorated with a geometrical fret pattern. The general expression of these carpets is geometric and straight lines, so its boundaries are usually decorated with polygonal elements or patterned plant elements.
  • The most common design of Mashad rugs are medallion, usually round or elongated medallions, and they are embellished with pendants and decorated with fancy elements. The central area is again adorned with frangipani motifs and natural flowers and brown leaf decorations. It usually consists of a vortex-wrapped Eslimi pattern. The corners of carpets are usually light-colored, such as white or ivory backgrounds. They are decorated with pendants, both pentagonal and almond-shaped, often by an Eslimi motif or vines connecting them with the center medallion.

It’s hard to deny that Iranian rugs and carpets’ amazing level of quality shows Iranians are able to create the best rugs and carpets in the world. Carpet weaving still plays a major part in the economy of modern Iran. Nowadays, the carpet weaving production is characterized by the revival of traditional dyeing with natural dyes, the reintroduction of traditional tribal patterns, but also by the invention of modern and innovative designs, woven in the centuries-old technique. Handmade Iranian rugs or Persian rugs are regarded as objects of high artistic and utilitarian value and prestige from the first time they were mentioned by ancient Greek writers until today.

Why Choose Rexrugs to Buy Iranian Rugs and Carpets?

The oriental handmade Iranian rugs and carpets are unique works of art that deserve to be preserved and used by several generations to come. Rexrugs here covers all most designs of handmade Iranian rugs and carpets with over 5,000 pieces silk rugs inventory. Just don’t be hesitated to explore the great Iranian rugs and carpets for your interior space now!

Find our current vintage Iranian silk rugs as below:

Iranian Rugs — Iranian Carpets are often known as Persian Rugs, which are also regarded as one of the oldest oriental rugs. The Iranian rugs and carpets are the valuable treasure with culture.

Brife History of Iranian Rugs and Carpets

Persia, the ancient Persian name of Iran, boasts to be the world’s most superior culture in carpet manufacturing. And the art of carpet weaving and dying is inherited here. Iran is one of the largest countries in the Middle East and stretches like a bridge between the east and west. And the famous ancient Silk Road passed through the country and its caravans brought not only merchandise but also thoughts and ideas were spread among the population.

The country’s official name was Persia until 1934. During the first great Persian dynasty (Achemanids 550-330 B.C.), the empire stretched from Ethiopia to India and from the Bosporus to Oxus. The Persian emperors back then, Darius and Xerxes ruled over 28 different people. The history of the country is dramatic; rulers have come and gone. Both Djinghis Kahn and Timur Lenk ruled Persia. But during the Safavid period, especially during the rule of Shah Abbas the great, who reigned from 1587 to 1629, the country’s art, architecture and handicraft products were greatly developed, Isfahan became the new magnificent capital of the country. And since 1979 Iran has become an Islamic republic country. The oil provides the largest export income, but when it comes to occupation the carpet manufacturing dominates. Millions of Iranians are involved in some way with manufacturing of carpets. And the carpets manufactured in the country are often named after the area where they are made, for example Qum, Tabriz, Isfahan, Hamadan, Mashad, Kerman and Bidjar, etc.. Of course, the carpets can also be named after different ethnic groups like the Ghashghais.

Classic Carpet Weaving Cities in Iran

Iranian rugs and carpets woven in towns and regional centers like Isfahan, Tabriz, Qum, Nain, Kerman, Kashan, Sarouk, Hamadan and Mashed are always characterized by their specific weaving techniques and use of high-quality materials, colors and patterns.

  • Like Isfahan rug, Isfahan became the new magnificent capital of Iran in 16 century, at which Persian rug welcomed its gold time. At that time, Isfahan had the best handmade rug in the world, which were often taken as the significant gifts to present several European countries.
  • Tabriz rug takes traditional patterns as the focus covering almost all patterns of Persian carpets and meanwhile creating many unique designs, such as the Mahi fish-shaped pattern, which is considered by many connoisseurs as the most elegant design in Persian carpets and rugs.
  • Qum rug is famous for the handmade silk rug of all Persian rugs with exquisite design, superb handcrafts and magnificent colors.
  • Nain rug is often known by the silk and wool mixed rug. It’s characterized by using white silk to outline the floral pattern.
  • Kerman rug uses asymmetrical knots with very detailed and intricate curve styles. And there are many layouts in the center area: such as central medallions, trees, bushes, hunting scene, and various other human figures or movements.
  • Kashan rug is mostly designed with a diamond-shaped medallion matching with traditional red and blue colors. Some recent Kashan rugs also use light brown, grayish blue and palm green hues.
  • Sarouk rugs are commonly used for asymmetrical knots and easily identifiable by the straight lines of the Persian fancy decorations. These traditional Persian fancy decorations include vines, leaves and buds, which appear rigid in the carpet but are very effective. This highly innovative line character began in the late nineteenth century and slowly turned itself into a curve and natural style. This layout is most commonly used in the center medallion which can be a large hexagon, a small round or rhomboidal shape with pendants and triangle walls that extend outward on both sides. The Sarouk rug also employs the layout of decorative elements and prayer rugs. The background of the central area is usually ivory, beige, red, and blue colors.
  • Hamadan rugs are made with a symmetric knotting method. The suede is trimmed very high, and there is also a compact structure, including alternately passing through the weft in each row of nodes. The most common layout consists of a medallion or an overlapping medallion. The rhomboid and hexagonal medallions are also characteristic of the carpets in this area which usually has two pendants protruding outwards, and its interior is decorated with a geometrical fret pattern. The general expression of these carpets is geometric and straight lines, so its boundaries are usually decorated with polygonal elements or patterned plant elements.
  • The most common design of Mashad rugs are medallion, usually round or elongated medallions, and they are embellished with pendants and decorated with fancy elements. The central area is again adorned with frangipani motifs and natural flowers and brown leaf decorations. It usually consists of a vortex-wrapped Eslimi pattern. The corners of carpets are usually light-colored, such as white or ivory backgrounds. They are decorated with pendants, both pentagonal and almond-shaped, often by an Eslimi motif or vines connecting them with the center medallion.

It’s hard to deny that Iranian rugs and carpets’ amazing level of quality shows Iranians are able to create the best rugs and carpets in the world. Carpet weaving still plays a major part in the economy of modern Iran. Nowadays, the carpet weaving production is characterized by the revival of traditional dyeing with natural dyes, the reintroduction of traditional tribal patterns, but also by the invention of modern and innovative designs, woven in the centuries-old technique. Handmade Iranian rugs or Persian rugs are regarded as objects of high artistic and utilitarian value and prestige from the first time they were mentioned by ancient Greek writers until today.

Why Choose Rexrugs to Buy Iranian Rugs and Carpets?

The oriental handmade Iranian rugs and carpets are unique works of art that deserve to be preserved and used by several generations to come. Rexrugs here covers all most designs of handmade Iranian rugs and carpets with over 5,000 pieces silk rugs inventory. Just don’t be hesitated to explore the great Iranian rugs and carpets for your interior space now!

Find our current vintage Iranian silk rugs as below:

Iranian Rugs and Carpets

Iranian Rugs — Iranian Carpets are often known as Persian Rugs, which are also regarded as one of the oldest oriental rugs. The Iranian rugs and carpets are the valuable treasure with culture.

Brife History of Iranian Rugs and Carpets

Persia, the ancient Persian name of Iran, boasts to be the world’s most superior culture in carpet manufacturing. And the art of carpet weaving and dying is inherited here. Iran is one of the largest countries in the Middle East and stretches like a bridge between the east and west. And the famous ancient Silk Road passed through the country and its caravans brought not only merchandise but also thoughts and ideas were spread among the population.

The country’s official name was Persia until 1934. During the first great Persian dynasty (Achemanids 550-330 B.C.), the empire stretched from Ethiopia to India and from the Bosporus to Oxus. The Persian emperors back then, Darius and Xerxes ruled over 28 different people. The history of the country is dramatic; rulers have come and gone. Both Djinghis Kahn and Timur Lenk ruled Persia. But during the Safavid period, especially during the rule of Shah Abbas the great, who reigned from 1587 to 1629, the country’s art, architecture and handicraft products were greatly developed, Isfahan became the new magnificent capital of the country. And since 1979 Iran has become an Islamic republic country. The oil provides the largest export income, but when it comes to occupation the carpet manufacturing dominates. Millions of Iranians are involved in some way with manufacturing of carpets. And the carpets manufactured in the country are often named after the area where they are made, for example Qum, Tabriz, Isfahan, Hamadan, Mashad, Kerman and Bidjar, etc.. Of course, the carpets can also be named after different ethnic groups like the Ghashghais.

Classic Carpet Weaving Cities in Iran

Iranian rugs and carpets woven in towns and regional centers like Isfahan, Tabriz, Qum, Nain, Kerman, Kashan, Sarouk, Hamadan and Mashed are always characterized by their specific weaving techniques and use of high-quality materials, colors and patterns.

  • Like Isfahan rug, Isfahan became the new magnificent capital of Iran in 16 century, at which Persian rug welcomed its gold time. At that time, Isfahan had the best handmade rug in the world, which were often taken as the significant gifts to present several European countries.
  • Tabriz rug takes traditional patterns as the focus covering almost all patterns of Persian carpets and meanwhile creating many unique designs, such as the Mahi fish-shaped pattern, which is considered by many connoisseurs as the most elegant design in Persian carpets and rugs.
  • Qum rug is famous for the handmade silk rug of all Persian rugs with exquisite design, superb handcrafts and magnificent colors.
  • Nain rug is often known by the silk and wool mixed rug. It’s characterized by using white silk to outline the floral pattern.
  • Kerman rug uses asymmetrical knots with very detailed and intricate curve styles. And there are many layouts in the center area: such as central medallions, trees, bushes, hunting scene, and various other human figures or movements.
  • Kashan rug is mostly designed with a diamond-shaped medallion matching with traditional red and blue colors. Some recent Kashan rugs also use light brown, grayish blue and palm green hues.
  • Sarouk rugs are commonly used for asymmetrical knots and easily identifiable by the straight lines of the Persian fancy decorations. These traditional Persian fancy decorations include vines, leaves and buds, which appear rigid in the carpet but are very effective. This highly innovative line character began in the late nineteenth century and slowly turned itself into a curve and natural style. This layout is most commonly used in the center medallion which can be a large hexagon, a small round or rhomboidal shape with pendants and triangle walls that extend outward on both sides. The Sarouk rug also employs the layout of decorative elements and prayer rugs. The background of the central area is usually ivory, beige, red, and blue colors.
  • Hamadan rugs are made with a symmetric knotting method. The suede is trimmed very high, and there is also a compact structure, including alternately passing through the weft in each row of nodes. The most common layout consists of a medallion or an overlapping medallion. The rhomboid and hexagonal medallions are also characteristic of the carpets in this area which usually has two pendants protruding outwards, and its interior is decorated with a geometrical fret pattern. The general expression of these carpets is geometric and straight lines, so its boundaries are usually decorated with polygonal elements or patterned plant elements.
  • The most common design of Mashad rugs are medallion, usually round or elongated medallions, and they are embellished with pendants and decorated with fancy elements. The central area is again adorned with frangipani motifs and natural flowers and brown leaf decorations. It usually consists of a vortex-wrapped Eslimi pattern. The corners of carpets are usually light-colored, such as white or ivory backgrounds. They are decorated with pendants, both pentagonal and almond-shaped, often by an Eslimi motif or vines connecting them with the center medallion.

It’s hard to deny that Iranian rugs and carpets’ amazing level of quality shows Iranians are able to create the best rugs and carpets in the world. Carpet weaving still plays a major part in the economy of modern Iran. Nowadays, the carpet weaving production is characterized by the revival of traditional dyeing with natural dyes, the reintroduction of traditional tribal patterns, but also by the invention of modern and innovative designs, woven in the centuries-old technique. Handmade Iranian rugs or Persian rugs are regarded as objects of high artistic and utilitarian value and prestige from the first time they were mentioned by ancient Greek writers until today.

Why Choose Rexrugs to Buy Iranian Rugs and Carpets?

The oriental handmade Iranian rugs and carpets are unique works of art that deserve to be preserved and used by several generations to come. Rexrugs here covers all most designs of handmade Iranian rugs and carpets with over 5,000 pieces silk rugs inventory. Just don’t be hesitated to explore the great Iranian rugs and carpets for your interior space now!

Find our current vintage Iranian silk rugs as below:

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